Menu
header photo

Title

Our Only Home

Current population numbers

www.census.gov/popclock/

Information about climate change, biodiversity loss, air pollution and water pollution

https://www.erizon.com.au/top-environmental-concerns/

Information and actions you can take to live sustainably

https://sustainableamerica.org

https://www.breakfreefromplastic.org/

Graph and article about how much trash one American, on average, produces in one year (loan company website)

https://www.titlemax.com/discovery-center/lifestyle/trash-one-person-produces-year/

Links to more information about different aspects of living sustainably:

http://www.greenandgrowing.org/recycling-ultimate-guide/

https://couponfollow.com/research/sustainability-guide (a coupon company sustainability guide for college students, but helpful for other adults as well)

saving water, reusing/recycling, energy efficiency, outdoor conservation, and reducing waste

http://www.homeadvisor.com/article.show.Reduce-Waste-and-Save-Money-at-Home.17328.html

Things that you can do under the categories of: Home, Lawn and Garden, Office, Travel, Family, Re-Use-It, General and lists of actions you can take

www.ChasingGreen.org

Find out more about recycling, composting, water and energy conservation, and green cleaning tips

https://www.angieslist.com/articles/green-solutions-your-home-and-family.htm

Less toxic cleaning

https://www.care2.com/greenliving/clean-house-top-10-eco-friendly-ways.html

http://dpw.lacounty.gov/epd/hhw/alternative_recipes.pdf

https://www.realsimple.com/home-organizing/green-living/natural-cleaning-recipes

https://greencleaningreviews.com/the-essential-guide-to-green-cleaning-for-pet-owners/

Shopping

Plan for sustainable food consumption and production (planetary health diet)

https://eatforum.org/eat-lancet-commission

https://www.thedailymeal.com/cook/least-eco-friendly-things-you-buy-grocery-store-gallery

https://foodiestoday.com/how-to-inspire-your-children-to-eat-more-plant-based-foods/

 

Find out if your hygiene or cosmetic products include plastic microbeads (refuse to buy those products and ask the companies that use microbeads to stop)

https://www.beatthemicrobead.org/

Products for children

http://www.parents.com/parenting/better-parenting/green/the-ultimate-guide-to-green-parenting/

products for pets

https://www.retailmenot.com/blog/shopping-green-for-your-pet.html

https://green-mom.com/being-an-eco-friendly-pet-owner

Student project about thrift stores

thrifting.io

remodeling your home

https://www.homecity.com/going-green-a-guide-to-eco-friendly-home-modifications

https://www.remodelgurus.com/top-15-green-home-improvements/

Information about energy efficient mortgages

https://www.mortgagecalculator.org/helpful-advice/energy-efficient-mortgages.php

building a green home

https://www.consumersbase.com/green-home-building-guide/

https://zeroenergyproject.org/build/twelve-steps-affordable-zero-energy-home-construction-design/

Traveling

https://ordinarytraveler.com/responsible-eco-friendly-travel-tips

https://millionmilesecrets.com/guides/staying-green-while-traveling-how-to-reduce-your-carbon-footprint/

https://www.ecowatch.com/eco-friendly-travel-guide-2620131329.html

For businesses

http://www.triplepundit.com/2014/10/goals-objectives-incorporating-green-business-practices/

Environmentally friendly gardening (refers to the Pacific Northwest but a lot of the information is general and therefore can be used in other locations). http://www.naturalyardcare.org/

https://www.homeadvisor.com/r/organic-pest-control/

https://content.yardmap.org/learn/wildlife-value-of-a-messy-garden

Climate Victory Gardens

https://greenamerica.org/climate-victory-gardens/commitment-grow-climate-victory-garden

USDA tools and programs for agricultural sustainably (help for farmers)

https://www.farmers.gov/conserve

Composting

https://www.improvenet.com/a/guide-to-composting-at-home (home improvement referral company)

https://www.wideopeneats.com/inclusive-guide-home-composting/

https://www.austinrealestate.com/homeowners-guide-to-composting.php (a real estate company webpage)

Gardening with children 

https://www.fix.com/blog/kids-gardening-for-health-and-fun/

Hiking with children

https://hikeitbaby.com/blog/leave-no-trace-kids/

Reduce, reuse, recycle for kids

http://www.homeadvisor.com/r/reduce-reuse-recycle-for-kids/

http://www.oberk.com/recycling-glass-plastic-metal-and-more

Bottle store webpage with links to articles about recycling, saving energy, composting, etc.  Although the focus is on kids, adults can learn from it too.

https://www.bottlestore.com/ways-to-reduce-reuse-recycle-plastic-containers

Permaculture

http://www.regenerativedesign.org/

Information about ecological footprints and to find your own

http://www.footprintnetwork.org/en/index.php/GFN/page/world_footprint/

Planet Friendly Projects

https://www.nrdc.org/stories/24-green-projects-tackle-now

Guides and articles on various topics (related products for sale)

https://learn.eartheasy.com/

Guidelines for and importance of living sustainably

alt

Are you ready to begin making a livable future?

Start by taking time to think about your day-to-day activities in a new way by asking yourself how you can reduce, reuse, recycle, and use more environmentally friendly alternatives.

Reduce:

Only acquire what you need and as much as you will use.

Only use what you need to and as much as you need.

When possible, choose multiple use instead of single use products.

Use items for as long as you can.

Reuse:

Instead of buying something new, buy it used.

Use something you already have in a new way.

Recycle:

Recycle everything you can.

Buy products made from recycled materials.

When possible, use earth-friendly alternatives that are:

  • made of materials that come from renewable resources and/or can be recycled
  • not made of plastic or other fossil fuel derived materials
  • energy efficient
  • less toxic (Just because something is labeled ‘organic’ or ‘all natural’ does not necessarily mean it is safe or environmentally friendly. When eaten, some mushrooms are lethal to humans; chocolate is toxic to dogs and cats; and avocados harmful to birds).  

Adopt a planet friendly diet1

The planetary health diet below is flexitarian and was designed to be modified for use by different cultures. Quantities are per day, total calories (kcal) = 2,500:

Food category

% total kcal 

or calories

daily kcal

or calories

ounces

 (range)

grams 

(range)

Whole grains

(rice, wheat, corn and other) 

32   

811

8.2

232

Unsaturated oils 

14

354

1.4

(0.7 – 1.4)

40

 (20- 80) 

Nuts

12

291

1.8

(0 - 2.6)

50

(0 – 75) 

Legumes

11

284

2.6

(0 - 3.5)

74

(0 – 100) 

Dairy foods

(whole milk or equivalents) 

6

153

8.8

 (0 -17.6)

250

 (0 – 500)

Fruits (all fruits) 

5

126

7.05

(3.5 – 10.7)

200

(100 – 300)

Added sugars (all sugars)

5

120

1.1

(0 - 1.1)

31

(0 – 31)  

Saturated oils 

4

96

0.42

(0 - 0.42)

11.8

 (0 – 11.8) 

Vegetables (all vegetables)  

3

78

10.7

(7.05 – 21.2)

300

(200 – 600) 

Chicken and other poultry 

2

62

1 (0 - 2)

29 (0 - 58)

Fish

2

40

0.99

(0 - 3.5)

28

(0 – 100) 

Tubers or starchy vegetables

(potatoes and cassava) 

2

39

1.8

(0 - 3.5)

 

50

(0 – 100)

Beef, lamb and pork  

1

30

0.5

(0 - 0.99)

14 (0 – 28) 

Eggs

0.8

19

0.5

(0 - 0.9)

13 (0 – 25) 

 

 

As consumers we have a great deal of power. If we ask for and buy items that are environmentally friendly, companies will pay attention and there will be increasingly more of such products made.

 

For information about saving specific resources click on the following links:

Resources, Energy, Water

 

alt

Why is it important to live sustainably?

It is very easy in our day-to-day lives to feel isolated from nature. This isolation gives us the sense that we are independent from nature when, in truth, just the opposite is the case. A term often used when discussing nature is ‘ecosystem’. An ecosystem is nature broken down into parts such as a forest or an ocean and is composed of everything in that particular environment (plants, animals, rocks, sources of water, etc.). Each of the organisms in an ecosystem has a function. Some of these functions are important to humans because we depend on them for our well being. Examples of important functions include purification of soil and water, recycling of organic wastes, and break down of pollutants as well as insect pollination, which is necessary for 1/3 of the world’s food supplies. In fact, there are over 10 million species that provide essential functions that cannot be duplicated by humans.2

Unfortunately, human actions have changed ecosystems thereby disrupting the ability of the organisms in them to provide those essential functions.3 In general, after contact with humans, ecosystems tend to be more at risk to further disruption, less complex, and have fewer species. This is a global problem - no place on earth will be unaffected. If no action is taken to correct these problems, ecosystems worldwide could become so damaged that they no longer will support humans resulting in our extinction and that of numerous other species as well.4

alt

How have human actions altered the environment?

The impact people have on ecosystems as a whole (nature) comes from three sources:

population projection 95% certaintyhttps://populationmatters.org/mythbusting

  • the rate of consumption of natural resources (water, fossil fuels, land for growing food, etc.) to support the standard of living of those people
  • the technologies used (drilling for oil, mining for coal, etc.) to achieve that rate of consumption5

alt

The goal is to find ways to lessen these impacts. Because the harm is caused by humans, it is up to us to take action.

 

Links to the other website pages:

Home     Climate Solutions    Climate Problems       Community

 

Literature cited

Image of earth from http://visibleearth.nasa.gov/view.php?id=55418, photographs and other images are from https://pixabay.com.

1 https://eatforum.org/eat-lancet-commission

2 Pimentel D., et al. 2010. Will limited land, water, and energy control human population numbers in the future? Human  Ecology 38:599–611.

3 Folk et al. 2011. Reconnecting to the biosphere. Ambio 40: 719-738.

4 Hern, W.M. 1993. Is human culture carcinogenic for uncontrolled population growth and ecological destruction? BioScience 43: 768-773.

5 Harte, J. 2007. Human population as a dynamic factor in environmental degradation.  Population and Environment 28: 223-236.